You are here

MEDICAL ARTICLES

Commonly known as HPV, Human papillomavirus is a virus that infects the skin and genital area, in many cases leading to a variety of genital, anal, and oropharyngeal cancers in men and women. Strong evidence exists showing that penetrative genital sex and oral sex can transmit HPV. However, while HPV is also often detected in the hands, the question of whether hand-genital contacts can transmit HPV has long been a source of debate among researchers.

The social stigmas and myths surrounding the human papilloma virus (HPV) could make women anxious, including raising fears about their partners' fidelity and putting them off going for cervical screening, according to research presented at Cancer Research UK's Early Diagnosis Conference in Birmingham today (Wednesday).

A survey conducted by Jo’s Cervical Cancer Trust has found that a “concerning” level of misunderstanding and stigma surrounding human papilloma virus could be putting women off going for life-saving cervical smear tests.

 

The survey, which included more than 2,000 women, found that 40% were concerned a positive result would mean their partner had been unfaithful, 40% were worried about what others may think of them having the virus and two-thirds would be worried it meant they had cancer.

Cervical cancer can be insidious. Changes to the cervix are often detected with a pap smear, but for those with limited access to health care, cervical and vaginal cancers can go unnoticed for years--silently growing, spreading and invading other organs--and by the time they're detected, they may be so advanced that the patient's prognosis is poor and her treatment options few.

An interview with Professor Attila Lorincz from Queen Mary University of London (QMUL), discussing the development of a new cervical cancer test that is able to identify cervical cancer and pre-cancer in 100% cases.

How do we currently screen for cervical cancer in the UK?

The main method of cervical cancer screening is the Pap cytology (smear) test, however, we are now slowly transitioning to HPV screening. The cytology test is gradually being replaced and transitioned to a follow-up, or triage test.

 

Tags: hpv27/01/2019

Key facts

  • Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a group of viruses that are extremely common worldwide.
  • There are more than 100 types of HPV, of which at least 14 are cancer-causing (also known as high risk type).
  • HPV is mainly transmitted through sexual contact and most people are infected with HPV shortly after the onset of sexual activity.
  • Cervical cancer is caused by sexually acquired infection with certain types of HPV.
  • Two HPV types (16 and 18) cause 70% of cervical cancers and precancerous cervical lesions.
Tags: ICD-105/01/2019

To gear up for the change from ICD-9, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has provided updates and training and has kept ICD-9 changes to a minimum in an effort to build a strong crosswalk to ICD-10. Last year, the U.S. was given one more year to prepare, but that will not be the case this year. In fewer than 75 days, on Oct. 1, the U.S. will convert to ICD-10 coding.

Tags: Anal cytology5/01/2019

Αnal cancer incidence is on the rise in North America with rates of both invasive and in situ squamous carcinomas of the anus increasing sharply over the past several decades. While women have the highest overall likelihood of developing anal carcinomas, certain male subpopulations (namely men who have sex with men and those who are HIV positive) are at a dramatically increased risk of developing squamous precursors and carcinomas of the anal canal.

Pages