You are here

biomarker

Case Western Reserve University researchers and partners, including a collaborator at Cleveland Clinic, are pushing the boundaries of how "smart" diagnostic-imaging machines identify cancers--and uncovering clues outside the tumor to tell whether a patient will respond well to chemotherapy.

New research demonstrating the clinical utility of Bio-Rad's Droplet Digital PCR (ddPCR) powered liquid biopsy will be presented this week during the 2019 American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting in Atlanta, March 29-April 3. Many of the studies rely on the sensitivity, speed, and cost-effectiveness of ddPCR technology to measure blood-based tumor biomarkers in a reproducible way.

A new blood test can detect heart attacks hours faster than the current gold-standard blood test, according to a study led by Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine researchers.

The new test measures a protein that is released to the bloodstream by dying heart muscle. The protein is called cardiac myosin binding protein-C (cMyBP-C). The study found that cMyBP-C is released to the blood within just 15 minutes of cardiac damage, and rises to significant levels in three hours.

The presence of the human high-risk papillomavirus (HPV) in the diagnosis of invasive cervical cancer is linked to a greatly improved prognosis compared with if high-risk HPV cannot be identified in the tumor, researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden report in the scientific journal PLOS Medicine. The researchers believe that high-risk HPV can be another important prognostic marker that can inform the choice of therapeutic strategy.

A highly sensitive blood test that detects minute traces of cancer-specific DNA has been shown to accurately determine whether patients with HPV-related oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) are free from cancer following radiation therapy. Findings will be presented today at the 60th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO).

In a spectacular new study, researchers from the University of Copenhagen have discovered a method of diagnosing a broad range of cancers at their early stages by utilizing a particular malaria protein, which sticks to cancer cells in blood samples. The researchers hope that this method can be used in cancer screenings in the near future.

Every year, more than 330,000 people are diagnosed with kidney cancer worldwide. More than 80 percent of those new cases are renal cell carcinomas (RCC). When caught early, the five-year survival rate is more than 90 percent. Patients diagnosed with more invasive tumors, however, have dramatically poorer prognoses, with five-year survival rates of 50 percent and 10 percent for patients diagnosed at stages III and IV respectively. Early detection could improve the overall survival rate in patients at high risk for death from RCC.

The research showed that a protein called KIM-1, which is elevated in the blood of some RCC patients at the time of diagnosis, could also be used as a tool to predict onset of the disease up to five years prior to diagnosis.

Lead investigator Rupal Bhatt (Harvard Medical School) says the study showed a significant association between plasma KIM-1 concentrations and the risk of renal cell carcinoma.

When people produce excessive amounts of urine - more than three litres each day in adults is considered too much - doctors often find it difficult to establish a diagnosis under certain circumstances. In addition to "normal" diabetes which is easy to diagnose by measuring blood glucose levels, there are three major causes that can trigger the disorder: Firstly, insufficient production of the hormone vasopressin, which regulates the amount of urine. In this case, the diagnosis would be "central diabetes insipidus".

Results of the European multi-center study of Bladder EpiCheck™ urine test, supporting reduction of invasive procedures, were published in the European Urology Oncology journal

Pages

Subscribe to biomarker