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From this September, boys of 12 and 13 will receive the HPV vaccine in all UK schools, hopefully preventing mouth, throat, penile and anal cancers caused by this oncovirus.

This occurs 11 years after a similar program for girls. The whole HPV vaccine program is now expected to prevent more than 100,000 cancer cases by 2058. This includes over 64,000 cervical cancers, almost 20,000 other cancers in women, and 30,000 cancers in men.

The use of molecular biomarkers in minimally invasive sampling opens a promising perspective for the early detection of endometrial cancer. This is the conclusion reached by the members of Screenwide research group, formed by researchers from the Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL) and the Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO-Hospitalet).

A potential new immune-based therapy to treat precancers in the cervix completely eliminated both the lesion and the underlying HPV infection in a third of women enrolled in a clinical trial.

The shot, a therapeutic vaccine, injects a specific protein that triggers an immune system response to attack high-risk HPV types that cause nearly all cervical cancer precursors, known as cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, or CIN.

An analysis of cervical precancers over a period of seven years showed that two strains of human papillomavirus (HPV) that have been targeted by vaccination since 2006 have declined, accounting for a smaller proportion of cervical disease. The study offers evidence that HPV vaccination reduced the incidence of infections that can lead to cervical cancer

Journal in Which the Study was Published: Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

Scaling up the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine could eradicate cervical cancer in high-income countries within 30 years, with most other countries following by the end of the century, according to new research.

In 2018, there were 570,000 new cases of cervical cancer, which represented 6.6% of all female cancers. The World Health Organization (WHO) stated that around 90% of these deaths occurred in low- and middle-income countries.

Infection with high-risk strains of the human papillomavirus (HPV), which have been linked to cancer, might increase the risk of heart and blood vessel or cardiovascular disease, especially among women with obesity or other cardiovascular risk factors, according to new research in Circulation Research, an American Heart Association journal.

The social stigmas and myths surrounding the human papilloma virus (HPV) could make women anxious, including raising fears about their partners' fidelity and putting them off going for cervical screening, according to research presented at Cancer Research UK's Early Diagnosis Conference in Birmingham today (Wednesday).

A survey conducted by Jo’s Cervical Cancer Trust has found that a “concerning” level of misunderstanding and stigma surrounding human papilloma virus could be putting women off going for life-saving cervical smear tests.

 

The survey, which included more than 2,000 women, found that 40% were concerned a positive result would mean their partner had been unfaithful, 40% were worried about what others may think of them having the virus and two-thirds would be worried it meant they had cancer.

Cervical cancer can be insidious. Changes to the cervix are often detected with a pap smear, but for those with limited access to health care, cervical and vaginal cancers can go unnoticed for years--silently growing, spreading and invading other organs--and by the time they're detected, they may be so advanced that the patient's prognosis is poor and her treatment options few.

Researchers have uncovered an increased risk of cervical cancer in women whose cervical cells test positive for certain high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) types but do not show any signs of cellular abnormalities. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the findings may help refine guidelines for cervical cancer screening.

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