You are here

chlamydia

Women that have undiagnosed sexually transmitted infections may be at greater risk of experiencing negative premenstrual symptoms (PMS), according to new Oxford University research.

The study was conducted as part of a long term partnership with the female health, fertility and period-tracking app, CLUE. The findings, published in Evolution Medicine & Public Health, suggest that the presence of an undiagnosed STI might aggravate the negative premenstrual experience.

A decade of data on hundreds of boys and girls who received the HPV vaccine indicates the vaccine is safe and effective long term in protecting against the most virulent strains of the virus, researchers report.

The findings support more widespread and early administration of the HPV vaccine before preadolescents and adolescents are exposed to the nation's most common sexually transmitted infection and the most common cause of cervical cancer, they report in the journal Pediatrics.

As the number of women in the military increases, so does the need for improved gynecologic care. Military women may be more likely to engage in high-risk sexual practices, be less likely to consistently use barrier contraception, and, therefore, more likely to contract sexually transmitted infections (STIs), according to research recently released by a physician at Women & Infants Hospital of Rhode Island.

Chlamydia trachomatis is a bacterium that is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections in Europe. Rates in sexually active young people are commonly between 5% and 10%. The number of diagnosed cases is increasing in many European  countries, in part due to increased testing and the use of more sensitive tests. People with genital chlamydia may experience symptoms of genital tract inflammation including urethritis and cervicitis, but the majority remains asymptomatic.

Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the cobas® HPV (Human Papillomavirus) Test for use as a first-line primary screening test for cervical cancer in women 25 and older. The approval follows the March 12 unanimous recommendation from the Microbiology Devices Panel of the FDA's Medical Devices Advisory Committee, making the cobas® HPV Test the first and only HPV test in the United States approved for first-line primary screening.

Key Facts

  • Chlamydia is spread through unprotected sex.
  • Most people who are infected with chlamydia don’t have symptoms.
  • If you are having sex, get tested at least once a year!
  • Chlamydia should be treated early to prevent serious infections and infertility.

 

 

Chlamydia is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections in the US. It’s caused by bacteria that can infect the vagina, cervix, fallopian tubes, anus, urethra, throat, or eye.

Subscribe to chlamydia