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Infection with high-risk strains of the human papillomavirus (HPV), which have been linked to cancer, might increase the risk of heart and blood vessel or cardiovascular disease, especially among women with obesity or other cardiovascular risk factors, according to new research in Circulation Research, an American Heart Association journal.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has been sued by several major public health groups because of the delays on the agency’s part to implement rules regarding electronic cigarettes and cigars. The health advocates say that this delay could mean that more consumers could be exposed to “lethal and addictive components” of these tobacco products for years before they could be controlled.

 

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Would banning ventilated filters on cigarettes protect public health?

Scientists from multiple institutions, including a group of addiction neuroscience researchers from the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, are gathering evidence under funding from the National Institutes of Health's National Cancer Institute to potentially inform a U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) decision about whether to recommend design changes to filtered cigarettes.

In a new research that comes via the American Cancer Society, it has been seen that over 40 percent of all cancers and nearly one in two cancer deaths can be prevented by incorporating simple lifestyle changes in daily routines.

The study titled, “Proportion and number of cancer cases and deaths attributable to potentially modifiable risk factors in the United States” was published in CA: Cancer Journal for Clinicians led by authors Farhad Islami, Ann Goding Sauer, Kimberly D Miller and colleagues.

The proportion of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) patients infected with the human papillomavirus (HPV) could be around a third, with high-risk versions of the virus accounting for almost three-quarters of those affected, indicate Taiwanese study results.

The findings also show that patients with the high-risk HPV variant HPV-18 were significantly more likely to develop secondary malignancies than their counterparts without this variant.

Study participants who reported tobacco use or had higher levels of biomarkers of tobacco exposure had a higher prevalence of the sexually transmitted infection, oral human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16), according to a study in the October 8 JAMA, a theme issue on infectious disease.

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