You are here

Colorectal Cancer

Women with early, low risk, hormone-driven breast cancer are less likely to have a recurrence of their disease if they have radiotherapy after surgery, as well as anti-hormone treatment, according to results from a trial that has followed 869 women for ten years.

Women with early, low risk, hormone-driven breast cancer are less likely to have a recurrence of their disease if they have radiotherapy after surgery, as well as anti-hormone treatment, according to results from a trial that has followed 869 women for ten years.

Inhibiting the Jagged 1 protein in mice prevents the proliferation and growth of colon and rectal tumors. What is more, this approach to the disease permits the removal of existing tumors.

The American Cancer Society is outlining its vision for cancer control in the decades ahead in a series of articles that begins publishing today. The series of articles forms the basis of a national cancer control plan; a blueprint toward the control of cancer and a mortality reduction goal for the year 2035.

A study published today by the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network (PanCAN), Perthera, Inc., and colleagues in the AACR journal Clinical Cancer Research found for the first time that precision medicine can improve outcomes and provide clinically meaningful information to pancreatic cancer patients.

Considerably more cases of suspected cancer can today be identified early within primary care. Partly based on symptoms but also statistics on the patients' visits to health centers, indicates research from Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Sweden.

The diagnosis and treatment of multiple myeloma, a cancer affecting plasma cells, traditionally forces patients to suffer through a painful bone biopsy. During that procedure, doctors insert a bone-biopsy needle through an incision to get a bone marrow sample -; or make a larger incision and remove a section of bone via surgery.

But the days of using bone biopsies to guide treatment for multiple myeloma and other cancers, such as many types of leukemia, may be numbered.

Tim Muldoon, assistant professor of biomedical engineering, has received a $500,000 Faculty Early Career Development Program award from the National Science Foundation to continue his work on an endoscopic probe that can be used in colonoscopies. The device is intended to provide superior images of living tissue within the gastrointestinal tract and other structures.

A report that Americans are drinking a lot of coffee might be good news in the battle against colon cancer, scientists with the Simmons Cancer Center at UT Southwestern Medical Center say.

A recent industry survey found that coffee consumption is steadily increasing, with 64 percent of adults reporting having had at least one cup of coffee the previous day. Prior studies have found that coffee drinking is associated with a lower risk of getting colon cancer, as well as reduced risk of recurring tumors and death from colon cancer.

Bottom Line: Bacterial load was significantly higher in pancreatic tumor samples from patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma compared with pancreatic tissue from normal individuals, and in studies using mice, eliminating certain "bad" bacteria slowed the growth of pancreatic cancer, reversed immune suppression, and upregulated the immune checkpoint protein PD1.

Journal in Which the Study was Published: Cancer Discovery, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

Pages

Subscribe to Colorectal Cancer