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Curcumin is widely used to impart color and flavor to food, but scientists have discovered that this yellow powder derived from the roots of the turmeric plant (Curcuma longa) can also help prevent or combat stomach cancer.

The study by researchers at the Federal University of São Paulo (UNIFESP) and the Federal University of Pará (UFPA) in Brazil identified possible therapeutic effects of this pigment and of other bioactive compounds found in food on stomach cancer, the third and fifth most frequent type of cancer among Brazilian men and women, respectively.

To explain a person's actions in the present, it sometimes helps to understand their past, including where they come from and how they were raised. This is also true of tumors. Delving into a tumor's cellular lineage, a Ludwig Cancer Research study shows, can reveal weaknesses to target for customized therapies.

The findings, detailed in the April 24 issue of the journal Nature, also illustrate how knowledge of the biochemistry and microenvironment of the tissue from which a tumor arises can help predict the genetic alterations its cancer cells are likely to undergo.

New research demonstrating the clinical utility of Bio-Rad's Droplet Digital PCR (ddPCR) powered liquid biopsy will be presented this week during the 2019 American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting in Atlanta, March 29-April 3. Many of the studies rely on the sensitivity, speed, and cost-effectiveness of ddPCR technology to measure blood-based tumor biomarkers in a reproducible way.

An interview with Professor Attila Lorincz from Queen Mary University of London (QMUL), discussing the development of a new cervical cancer test that is able to identify cervical cancer and pre-cancer in 100% cases.

How do we currently screen for cervical cancer in the UK?

The main method of cervical cancer screening is the Pap cytology (smear) test, however, we are now slowly transitioning to HPV screening. The cytology test is gradually being replaced and transitioned to a follow-up, or triage test.

 

A new method predicts the course of HPV-negative head and neck cancer after radiation chemotherapy. According to a recent article in the journal ‘Clinical Cancer Research’, five microRNAs (miRNAs) can provide the decisive data. The work was conducted at the Helmholtz Zentrum München and the University Hospital of the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München (LMU) in close collaboration with the German Cancer Consortium (DKTK).

 

Irradiation plan of a head and neck tumor. © University Hospital of the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München

Human papillomavirus (HPV) is widely known to cause nearly all cases of cervical cancer. However, you might not know that HPV also causes 70 percent of oropharyngeal cancer, a subset of head and neck cancers that affect the mouth, tongue, and tonsils. Although vaccines that protect against HPV infection are now available, they are not yet widespread, especially in men, nor do they address the large number of currently infected cancer patients.

In a new study, researchers at Uppsala University now demonstrate that one night of sleep loss has a tissue-specific impact on the regulation of gene expression and metabolism in humans. This may explain how shift work and chronic sleep loss impairs our metabolism and adversely affects our body composition. The study is published in the scientific journal Science Advances.

In a new study, researchers at Uppsala University now demonstrate that one night of sleep loss has a tissue-specific impact on the regulation of gene expression and metabolism in humans. This may explain how shift work and chronic sleep loss impairs our metabolism and adversely affects our body composition. The study is published in the scientific journal Science Advances.

Keratinocyte skin cells are common targets of the beta subtype of human papilloma virus. This usually harmless infection causes skin disease in people with rare gene mutations.

You're probably infected with one or more subtypes of the human papilloma virus--and, as alarming as that may sound, odds are you will never show any symptoms. The beta subtype of the virus, ß-HPV, is widespread in the general population and the least pathogenic; in fact, most carriers don't even know that they have it.

Some people respond well to both aerobic exercise and strength training, while others don't. And some of us respond well to only one of those things, but not both. Scientists at Joslin Diabetes Center now have uncovered a surprising molecular "switch" that may help to explain why this happens.

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