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New research published in the European Heart Journal has found that long-term antibiotic use in women can increase their risk of heart attack or stroke. The research involved 36,429 women from The Nurses’ Health Study.

 

The Nurses’ Health Study has been running in the US since 1976. The researchers run some of the most comprehensive investigations into the risk factors associated with chronic disease in women.

A record number of homeless people — 918 last year alone — are dying across Los Angeles County, on bus benches, hillsides, railroad tracks and sidewalks.

Deaths have jumped 76% in the past five years, outpacing the growth of the homeless population, according to a KHN analysis of the coroner's data.

Scientists at the UNC School of Medicine have revealed that the reason we eat more than we need to may be caused by cellular communication originating in the emotion-processing center of the brain. The research was published in the journal Neuron yesterday.

A new blood test can detect heart attacks hours faster than the current gold-standard blood test, according to a study led by Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine researchers.

The new test measures a protein that is released to the bloodstream by dying heart muscle. The protein is called cardiac myosin binding protein-C (cMyBP-C). The study found that cMyBP-C is released to the blood within just 15 minutes of cardiac damage, and rises to significant levels in three hours.

Infection with high-risk strains of the human papillomavirus (HPV), which have been linked to cancer, might increase the risk of heart and blood vessel or cardiovascular disease, especially among women with obesity or other cardiovascular risk factors, according to new research in Circulation Research, an American Heart Association journal.

An international research team led by a scientist at the University of California, Riverside, has for the first time identified individual types of the human papillomavirus, or HPV, that are specifically linked to HIV infection.

The study, published in the journal PLOS ONE, concludes that a person with any HPV type, more than one HPV type, or high-risk HPV is more likely to acquire HIV.

The study found the following HPV types are linked to HIV: HPV16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 52, 58.

Some people respond well to both aerobic exercise and strength training, while others don't. And some of us respond well to only one of those things, but not both. Scientists at Joslin Diabetes Center now have uncovered a surprising molecular "switch" that may help to explain why this happens.

Imaging tools like X-rays and MRI have revolutionized medicine by giving doctors a close up view of the brain and other vital organs in living, breathing people. Now, Columbia University researchers report a new way to zoom in at the tiniest scales to track changes within individual cells.

All healthcare facilities and hospitals need to step up their hand washing techniques as well as use of alcohol based hand sanitizers after reports of emergence of hospital super bacteria that are becoming more tolerant to alcohol.

Nutrition advisers agree about red meat being rich sources of iron, zinc, omega 3 fatty acids, vitamins especially B12 and suggest that these are good for the health of heart as well as the brain. However recent propaganda says too much red meat and processed meat can be harmful for health including raising the risk for certain cancers.

Most of the general population thus remains confused when choosing red meat about which one to take and in what quantities.

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