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Heart Attack

New research published in the European Heart Journal has found that long-term antibiotic use in women can increase their risk of heart attack or stroke. The research involved 36,429 women from The Nurses’ Health Study.

 

The Nurses’ Health Study has been running in the US since 1976. The researchers run some of the most comprehensive investigations into the risk factors associated with chronic disease in women.

A new blood test can detect heart attacks hours faster than the current gold-standard blood test, according to a study led by Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine researchers.

The new test measures a protein that is released to the bloodstream by dying heart muscle. The protein is called cardiac myosin binding protein-C (cMyBP-C). The study found that cMyBP-C is released to the blood within just 15 minutes of cardiac damage, and rises to significant levels in three hours.

Infection with high-risk strains of the human papillomavirus (HPV), which have been linked to cancer, might increase the risk of heart and blood vessel or cardiovascular disease, especially among women with obesity or other cardiovascular risk factors, according to new research in Circulation Research, an American Heart Association journal.

A new test to assess a whether or not someone is having a heart attack upon arriving in the emergency room was safe and effective, ruling out heart attack in emergency room patients faster than a conventional method, according to new research in the American Heart Association's journal Circulation.

According to a major new U.S. study, women who have heart attacks are more likely to survive if they are treated by a female doctor.

The study looks at 580,000 cases of heart attacks over the last 19 years. Of these, the researchers noted that 13.3 percent had died when treated by men compared to 12 percent who were being treated by a female doctor. Survival rates improved when the patients were treated by a male doctor who had more number of female colleagues on his team.

 

A report that Americans are drinking a lot of coffee might be good news in the battle against colon cancer, scientists with the Simmons Cancer Center at UT Southwestern Medical Center say.

A recent industry survey found that coffee consumption is steadily increasing, with 64 percent of adults reporting having had at least one cup of coffee the previous day. Prior studies have found that coffee drinking is associated with a lower risk of getting colon cancer, as well as reduced risk of recurring tumors and death from colon cancer.

Cleveland Clinic researchers found that implementing a four-step protocol for the most severe type of heart attack not only improved outcomes and reduced mortality in both men and women, but eliminated or reduced the gender disparities in care and outcomes typically seen in this type of event.

The research was presented at the American College of Cardiology's 67th Annual Scientific Session and published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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