You are here

Hormone

Women with early, low risk, hormone-driven breast cancer are less likely to have a recurrence of their disease if they have radiotherapy after surgery, as well as anti-hormone treatment, according to results from a trial that has followed 869 women for ten years.

Women with early, low risk, hormone-driven breast cancer are less likely to have a recurrence of their disease if they have radiotherapy after surgery, as well as anti-hormone treatment, according to results from a trial that has followed 869 women for ten years.

New research demonstrating the clinical utility of Bio-Rad's Droplet Digital PCR (ddPCR) powered liquid biopsy will be presented this week during the 2019 American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting in Atlanta, March 29-April 3. Many of the studies rely on the sensitivity, speed, and cost-effectiveness of ddPCR technology to measure blood-based tumor biomarkers in a reproducible way.

Nutrition advisers agree about red meat being rich sources of iron, zinc, omega 3 fatty acids, vitamins especially B12 and suggest that these are good for the health of heart as well as the brain. However recent propaganda says too much red meat and processed meat can be harmful for health including raising the risk for certain cancers.

Most of the general population thus remains confused when choosing red meat about which one to take and in what quantities.

When people produce excessive amounts of urine - more than three litres each day in adults is considered too much - doctors often find it difficult to establish a diagnosis under certain circumstances. In addition to "normal" diabetes which is easy to diagnose by measuring blood glucose levels, there are three major causes that can trigger the disorder: Firstly, insufficient production of the hormone vasopressin, which regulates the amount of urine. In this case, the diagnosis would be "central diabetes insipidus".

Scientists headed by ICREA researcher Angel R. Nebreda at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona) report a new mechanism that contributes to the development of inflammation-associated colon cancer and points to new therapeutic targets. The study has been published in the journal EMBO Molecular Medicine.

More than a million people worldwide are diagnosed with colon cancer every year. Although many of these cases are spontaneous, chronic inflammation is one of the main causes underlying the development of this disease.

A new study of prostate cancer in 202 men, whose cancers had spread and were resistant to standard treatment, found that a surprisingly large number of these cancers – about 17 percent – belong to a deadlier subtype of metastatic prostate cancer.

Previously, it was thought that these cancers constituted less than 1 percent of all prostate cancers.

Many cancer patients suffer from a loss of body mass known as cachexia. Approximately 20 percent of cancer-related deaths are attributed to the syndrome of cachexia, which in cancer patients is often characterized by a rapid and/or severe loss of fat and skeletal muscle. Dr. Melinda Sheffield-Moore, professor and head of the Department of Health and Kinesiology, along with researchers at University of Texas Medical Branch, recently published research showing that the hormone testosterone is effective at combatting cachexia in cancer patients and improving quality of life.

Each day, normal human cell tissues express a protein known as p53 that wages war against potential malignancies. However, between 30 and 40 percent of human breast cancers express a defective (mutant) form of p53 that helps cancer cells proliferate and grow.

Researchers from UT Southwestern's Charles and Jane Pak Center for Mineral Metabolism and Clinical Research and Internal Medicine's Division of Nephrology recently published work in Nature that reveals the molecular structure of the so-called "anti-aging" protein alpha Klotho (a-Klotho) and how it transmits a hormonal signal that controls a variety of biologic processes. The investigation was performed in collaboration with scientists from New York University School of Medicine and Wenzhou Medical University in China.

Pages

Subscribe to Hormone