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A joint research team from Russia and the U.K. has demonstrated the possibility of developing a new type of anti-neoplastic drugs based on nanoMIPs, or "plastic antibodies." NanoMIPs are synthetic polymers that can function as antibodies, selectively binding to target proteins on the surface of cancer cells. This approach could lead to a paradigm shift in the development of new methods for cancer treatment.

Yale Cancer Center (YCC) scientists have filled in a key gap in understanding the unusual route by which the Human papillomavirus (HPV) infects cells. Their findings, published online today in the journal Cell, may eventually help to broaden the scope of defenses against HPV and provide valuable clues for delivering drugs into cells.

HPV is a family of killers. Although there are effective vaccines against these viruses, they still cause about 5% of cancer deaths worldwide, including more than 250,000 women who die of cervical cancer each year.

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