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Obesity

Back in 1917, the same year that she cofounded the American Dietetic Association (now the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics), Lenna Frances Cooper authored an article in Good Health magazine that noted “in many ways the breakfast is the most important meal of the day, because it is the meal that gets the day started.” Good Health was published by the Battle Creek Sanitarium, a Michigan health resort run by Cooper’s mentor, John Harvey Kellogg, MD, the coinventor of corn flakes (his brother started the cereal business that would become the Kellogg Company).

New research published in the European Heart Journal has found that long-term antibiotic use in women can increase their risk of heart attack or stroke. The research involved 36,429 women from The Nurses’ Health Study.

 

The Nurses’ Health Study has been running in the US since 1976. The researchers run some of the most comprehensive investigations into the risk factors associated with chronic disease in women.

Scientists at the UNC School of Medicine have revealed that the reason we eat more than we need to may be caused by cellular communication originating in the emotion-processing center of the brain. The research was published in the journal Neuron yesterday.

Infection with high-risk strains of the human papillomavirus (HPV), which have been linked to cancer, might increase the risk of heart and blood vessel or cardiovascular disease, especially among women with obesity or other cardiovascular risk factors, according to new research in Circulation Research, an American Heart Association journal.

In a new study, researchers at Uppsala University now demonstrate that one night of sleep loss has a tissue-specific impact on the regulation of gene expression and metabolism in humans. This may explain how shift work and chronic sleep loss impairs our metabolism and adversely affects our body composition. The study is published in the scientific journal Science Advances.

In a new study, researchers at Uppsala University now demonstrate that one night of sleep loss has a tissue-specific impact on the regulation of gene expression and metabolism in humans. This may explain how shift work and chronic sleep loss impairs our metabolism and adversely affects our body composition. The study is published in the scientific journal Science Advances.

A preliminary study published in the August issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedingssuggests that, for some people, specific activities of gut bacteria may be responsible for their inability to lose weight, despite adherence to strict diet and exercise regimens.

Some people respond well to both aerobic exercise and strength training, while others don't. And some of us respond well to only one of those things, but not both. Scientists at Joslin Diabetes Center now have uncovered a surprising molecular "switch" that may help to explain why this happens.

Osaka University-led study shows how a high-fat diet and systemic inflammation contribute to prostate cancer progression

Osaka - Inflammation and evasion of the immune system have been reported to be some of the new hallmarks of cancer. Notably, a high-fat diet (HFD) causes obesity and chronic inflammation, and studies conducted on mice have shown that HFD could be associated with progression and survival of prostate cancer. In human studies, inflammation and immune cells are also linked to prostate cancer.

A new study led by researchers at Hokkaido University has shown that obesity may enhance the progression of cancer, while aspirin may protect against it.

 

Obesity is a known risk factor for some of the most common forms of cancer, including colon, pancreatic and breast cancer.

Studies have already demonstrated the role of obesity in promoting tumor growth and cancer progression, but the role it plays in the initiation of cancer is less clear.

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