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Otolaryngology

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Question  Is persistent detection of oral human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA after completion of primary therapy associated with recurrence and survival among patients with HPV-positive oral or oropharyngeal cancer?

In a new study published online June 25, 2018 in Nature Medicine, UC San Francisco researchers have identified a key biological pathway in human cancer patients that appears to prime the immune system for a successful response to immunotherapy drugs known as checkpoint inhibitors.

An increasing body of evidence suggests that a lack of exercise can cause a wide variety of diseases, but physical inactivity is not currently recognized as a risk factor for cancer.

UT Southwestern Simmons Cancer Center scientists next month will begin testing a digital nanosensor that lights up cancer tissue to see whether it can improve the accuracy of cancer surgeries, thereby reducing cancer recurrence and surgical morbidity.

The nanosensor, which works by reacting to low pH, illuminates cancer like a lightbulb, sharply distinguishing cancerous tissue from healthy tissue, and making it easier for surgeons to remove cancer cells while leaving healthy, functional tissue intact.

Human papilloma virus (HPV), the culprit behind cervical cancer and some forms of head and neck cancer may hide in small pockets on the surface of tonsils in people not known to carry the virus. The finding, reported by University of Rochester Medical Center researchers in the Journal of the American Medical Association, could be pivotal for the prevention of oropharyngeal cancers that form on the tonsils and tongue.

Tobacco and alcohol use may be the most common cause of head and neck cancers, but a new culprit has come on the scene in recent years.

The human papillomavirus (HPV) is now responsible for more than 60 percent of cases of oropharyngeal cancer diagnosed at Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, according to Dr. David Goldenberg, professor of surgery and medicine and director of Head and Neck Surgery.

Oropharyngeal cancer can affect the back third of the tongue, the soft palate, side and back walls of the throat and the tonsils.

The chronic oral inflammatory disease periodontitis may be associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) status in individuals with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), report researchers.

Their study findings show that among HNSCC patients, the odds for having HPV-positive tumors increased significantly with each millimeter of alveolar bone loss (ABL) - an established measure of periodontitis.

The incidence of human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated (HPV+) head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) of the oropharynx has dramatically increased over the last decade and is now more frequently diagnosed than uterine cervical cancer in the United States. To better understand the disease, a Yale Cancer Center team analyzed HNSCC data from The Cancer Genome Atlas to identify molecular characteristics of HPV+ HNSCC and correlated them with patient outcomes.

A new study reveals an alarming increase in oropharyngeal cancers among young adults. While the exact cause for this phenomenon is unknown, the human papillomavirus (HPV) may be to blame.

According to researchers from Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit there was an overall 60 percent increase from 1973 and 2009 in cancers of the base of tongue, tonsils, soft palate and pharynx in people younger than age 45.

Among Caucasians, there was a 113 percent increase, while among African-Americans the rate of these cancers declined by 52 percent during that period of time.

An increase in cases of a rare type of head and neck cancer appears to be linked to HPV, or human papillomavirus, according to a new study from researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center.

The study looked at patients with nasopharyngeal cancer, a tumor that grows behind the nose and at the top of the throat, above the tonsils. This rare cancer occurs in less than 1 of every 100,000 Americans.

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