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The United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) has released new recommendations on screening for cervical cancer. These latest recommendations continue the trend of decreasing participant burden by lengthening screening intervals, making the "annual Pap" a historical artifact. Since its introduction 75 years ago, exfoliative cytology commonly known as the Pap test has been the "gold-standard" screening test for cervical cancer.

It's all fun in the sun until you realize you should have reapplied more sunscreen. Sunburns are no fun, but more importantly, they are dangerous. This reddening of your skin caused by overexposure to the sun's ultraviolet (UV) radiation may seem like just a temporary irritation- but it can cause long-lasting damage.

Overexposure to the sun can result in:

Considerably more cases of suspected cancer can today be identified early within primary care. Partly based on symptoms but also statistics on the patients' visits to health centers, indicates research from Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Sweden.

Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center researchers developed a single blood test that screens for eight common cancer types and helps identify the location of the cancer.

The test, called CancerSEEK, is a unique noninvasive, multianalyte test that simultaneously evaluates levels of eight cancer proteins and the presence of cancer gene mutations from circulating DNA in the blood. The test is aimed at screening for eight common cancer types that account for more than 60 percent of cancer deaths in the U.S. Five of the cancers covered by the test currently have no screening test.

Gynecologic cancers affect any area of the female reproductive organs (uterus, cervix, ovaries, vulva). For 2017, the American Cancer Society estimates more than 100,000 new cases of gynecologic cancer and more than 31,000 deaths. Luckily these organs are either visible or can give early symptoms of pre-cancer and cancer.

Don't get two when one will do.

Instead of getting both a Pap test and an HPV test to screen for cervical cancer, many women should get just one or the other at regular intervals, according to a draft recommendation published this week by a panel of prevention experts.

"More than ever before, young cancer survivors are living long lives after treatment, but their health is more vulnerable. It's concerning that the majority of survivors are not taking full advantage of HPV vaccination, which is widely available and can help them stay cancer-free. Oncologists and primary care physicians are trusted resources for young survivors, and while barriers to HPV vaccination certainly exist, this study suggests that starting a conversation can help break down at least one."

Gynecologic cancers affect any area of the female reproductive organs (uterus, cervix, ovaries, vulva). For 2017, the American Cancer Society estimates more than 100,000 new cases of gynecologic cancer and more than 31,000 deaths. Luckily these organs are either visible or can give early symptoms of pre-cancer and cancer.

Male collegiate athletes have high rates of risk factors for infection with the cancer-causing human papillomavirus (HPV), but have low HPV vaccination rates and low awareness of their personal health risks, according to a study in the November issue of The Nurse Practitioner, published by Wolters Kluwer.

Don't get two when one will do.

Instead of getting both a Pap test and an HPV test to screen for cervical cancer, many women should get just one or the other at regular intervals, according to a draft recommendation published this week by a panel of prevention experts.

Both tests, which are performed on a sample of cells from a woman's cervix, are effective at screening for cervical cancer. The Pap test, also known as a Pap smear, examines the cells for abnormal growth while the HPV test looks for strains of the human papillomavirus that cause the disease.

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