You are here

Prostate

Compared with non-drinkers, men who consumed at least seven drinks per week during adolescence (ages 15-19) had three times the odds of being diagnosed with clinically significant prostate cancer.

Background: "The prostate is an organ that grows rapidly during puberty, so it's potentially more susceptible to carcinogenic exposure during the adolescent years," said Allott. "For this reason, we wanted to investigate if heavy alcohol consumption in early life was associated with the aggressiveness of prostate cancer later."

A new study of prostate cancer in 202 men, whose cancers had spread and were resistant to standard treatment, found that a surprisingly large number of these cancers – about 17 percent – belong to a deadlier subtype of metastatic prostate cancer.

Previously, it was thought that these cancers constituted less than 1 percent of all prostate cancers.

Osaka University-led study shows how a high-fat diet and systemic inflammation contribute to prostate cancer progression

Osaka - Inflammation and evasion of the immune system have been reported to be some of the new hallmarks of cancer. Notably, a high-fat diet (HFD) causes obesity and chronic inflammation, and studies conducted on mice have shown that HFD could be associated with progression and survival of prostate cancer. In human studies, inflammation and immune cells are also linked to prostate cancer.

Multiple SelectMDx Clinical Study Abstracts presented at 2018 Global Prostate Congress in Frankfurt, Germany

MDxHealth SA, today announced the publication of positive data demonstrating the value of the SelectMDx liquid biopsy test for Prostate Cancer in guiding patient management for men being considered for multiparametric MRI and the clinical utility in guiding biopsy decisions in real-world clinical practice. Data will be presented at the sixth Global Congress on Prostate Cancer (PROSCA) in Frankfurt, Germany, June 28-30, 2018.

Using sound waves, an international team of researchers has developed a gentle, contact-free method for separating circulating tumor cells from blood samples that is fast and efficient enough for clinical use.

Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are small pieces of a tumor that break away and flow through the bloodstream. They contain a wealth of information about the tumor, such as its type, physical characteristics and genetic mutations.

Considerably more cases of suspected cancer can today be identified early within primary care. Partly based on symptoms but also statistics on the patients' visits to health centers, indicates research from Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Sweden.

The diagnosis and treatment of multiple myeloma, a cancer affecting plasma cells, traditionally forces patients to suffer through a painful bone biopsy. During that procedure, doctors insert a bone-biopsy needle through an incision to get a bone marrow sample -; or make a larger incision and remove a section of bone via surgery.

But the days of using bone biopsies to guide treatment for multiple myeloma and other cancers, such as many types of leukemia, may be numbered.

Researchers of the Universitat Politècnica de València and the Universidad de Granada, together with doctors from the Hospital Clínic Universitari de València are working on the development of a new system to help diagnose prostate cancer. The work being developed is part of the SICAP project.

Heretofore, researchers have already developed an online application that helps pathologists evaluate samples obtained in biopsies, as well as an initial version of the system that is capable of establishing whether the samples are carcinogenic or not.

Image-targeted biopsy of the prostate leads to a substantial increase in the proportion of prostate cores identified as high risk compared with standard transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided biopsy, the results of a UK study indicate.

"This could lead to inflation in risk attribution as a consequence of deliberate oversampling of one part of the prostate - in other words, targeting," say Nicola Robertson (Royal Free Hospital, London) and colleagues. "New risk stratification models may be required for men who have pathology derived from image-directed biopsy strategies."

People diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer have a five-year survival rate of more than 93 per cent.

However, one problem that has eluded health professionals is identifying high-risk cancer patients amongst those already diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer.

GlycoNet network investigator Karla Williams is using carbohydrates (sugars) to shed more light on this issue. Williams, an assistant professor at the University of British Columbia (UBC), is using a sugar found on aggressive cancer cells surface that acts as a biomarker to detect high-risk cancer in patients.

Pages

Subscribe to Prostate