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Radiation Therapy

Restrictive prior authorization practices cause unnecessary delays and interference in care decisions for cancer patients, according to a new survey of nearly 700 radiation oncologists -- physicians who treat cancer patients using radiation-- released today by the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO).

Osaka University-centered study examines large-scale population survey and identifies increase in cervical cancer rate, along with younger patients' surprising resistance to radiation therapy

Cervical cancer rates can be greatly reduced through preventive measures against the human papillomavirus (HPV) along with proactive cancer screening. Japan may be showing how ignoring that knowledge could prove hazardous, as it is the only advanced economy in which the cervical cancer rate is increasing. New research adds further nuance to this situation.

A highly sensitive blood test that detects minute traces of cancer-specific DNA has been shown to accurately determine whether patients with HPV-related oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) are free from cancer following radiation therapy. Findings will be presented today at the 60th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO).

Follow-up imaging for women with non-metastatic breast cancer varies widely across the country, according to a new study led by researchers at UC San Francisco. Some patients go without the annual mammograms that experts recommend, while others with the same cancer diagnosis receive full-body scans that expose them to significant amounts of radiation and are not recommended by experts.

In an article published April 10th in the journal Cell Reports, researchers at the University of São Paulo (USP) describe a biomarker panel that could tell physicians which patients diagnosed with glioma, a type of brain cancer, will tend to progress to a more aggressive form of the disease in the event of relapse.

According to principal investigator Houtan Noushmehr, a professor at USP's Ribeirão Preto Medical School (FMRP-USP), between 80% and 90% of patients diagnosed with brain cancer develop a second tumor after surgical removal of the original lesion.

Medical school students receive little formal instruction in radiation oncology, a Loyola study has found.

Researchers who surveyed radiation oncology departments at academic medical centers found that only 41 percent of departments reported that at least one faculty member taught a topic related to radiation oncology. In only 25 percent of departments, a faculty member taught topics focused specifically on radiation oncology.

Tumor cells circulating throughout the body in blood vessels have long been feared as harbingers of metastasizing cancer - even though most free-floating cancer cells will not go on to establish a new tumor.

But if these cast-offs could be accurately counted, they could provide an additional way to track treatment or screen for the disease.

Breast cancer researchers have mapped early genetic alterations in normal-looking cells at various distances from primary tumors to show how changes along the lining of mammary ducts can lead to disease.

The new 9-valent human papillomavirus vaccine, can potentially prevent 80 percent of cervical cancers in the United States, if given to all 11- or 12-year-old children before they are exposed to the virus.

Two leading medical organizations say that using a Human papillomavirus (HPV) test alone for cervical cancer screening is an effective alternative to the current recommendation for screening with either cytology (the Pap test) alone or co-testing with cytology and HPV testing.

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