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New research published in the European Heart Journal has found that long-term antibiotic use in women can increase their risk of heart attack or stroke. The research involved 36,429 women from The Nurses’ Health Study.

 

The Nurses’ Health Study has been running in the US since 1976. The researchers run some of the most comprehensive investigations into the risk factors associated with chronic disease in women.

A remarkable recent increase in the diagnosis of vocal-cord cancer in young adults appears to be the result of infection with strains of human papilloma virus (HPV) that also cause cervical cancer and other malignancies. Investigators from Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) describe finding HPV infection in all tested samples of vocal-cord cancer from 10 patients diagnosed at age 30 or under, most of whom were non-smokers.

What are the most common disease-causing pathogens encountered by humans? Where do these pathogens reside in the environment?

The biggest disease-causing pathogens  are cold and flu, which are spread through respiratory secretions when someone sneezes, and contaminated environments. The questions for contaminated environments are; how do we keep the surface clean? And, how do we prevent individuals from touching a surface and then their faces including their mouths?

 

Scientists searching for a therapy to stop the deadly and mostly untreatable lung disease, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), found a new molecular target that slows or stops the illness in preclinical laboratory tests.

A research team at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center reports its data in the journal Cell Reports. It found that a gene called FOXF1 inhibits the IPF disease process, which includes extensive scarring in lung connective tissues, hyperproduction of harmful cells called myofibroblasts and excessive lung inflammation.

People getting more rays of sunlight -; and therefore vitamin D -; in August and September could help reduce the severity of flu season, according to a National Bureau of Economic Research working paper co-authored by a University of Kansas economist.

The researchers' key finding is that a 10 percent increase in relative sunlight diminishes the September reading on the 10-point flu scale index by three points. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control & Prevention maintains the index.

Three-dimensional visualization based on computer tomography imaging provides more thorough preparation for the diagnosis of lung diseases. Now the program passes the clinical testing stage. It has been already used to perform 25 transbronchial biopsies, the accuracy of the procedure has increased from 53% to 88%. The results of the research of UrFU scientists and the specialists of the Ural Scientific Research Institute of Phthisiopulmonology have been published in the European Respiratory Journal.

Integrated Diagnostics today announced the e-publication of full results of a large prospective clinical trial validating its Xpresys Lung 2® in the peer-reviewed medical journal CHEST.

Lung nodules are a diagnostic challenge with an estimated yearly incidence of 1.6 million in the United States. The majority of these patients have benign lung nodules, however, there are significant costs, morbidity and mortality associated with the invasive biopsies needed to determine which nodules are cancerous.

Lung cancer patients are particularly susceptible to malignant pleural effusion, when fluid collects in the space between the lungs and the chest wall. Researchers at the Helmholtz Zentrum München, in partnership with the German Center for Lung Research (DZL), have discovered a novel mechanism that causes this to happen. Their study, published in Nature Communications, now refines the mechanistic picture.

In childhood, asthma is more common in boys than girls. But around the time of puberty, that picture reverses. By midlife women are twice as likely as men to have asthma.

Researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center believe they know why. It has to do with the male hormone testosterone. Their findings, reported today by the journal Cell Reports, could lead to new ways to treat this chronic and often difficult-to-treat respiratory disease.

A decade of data on hundreds of boys and girls who received the HPV vaccine indicates the vaccine is safe and effective long term in protecting against the most virulent strains of the virus, researchers report.

The findings support more widespread and early administration of the HPV vaccine before preadolescents and adolescents are exposed to the nation's most common sexually transmitted infection and the most common cause of cervical cancer, they report in the journal Pediatrics.

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