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Stomach

Curcumin is widely used to impart color and flavor to food, but scientists have discovered that this yellow powder derived from the roots of the turmeric plant (Curcuma longa) can also help prevent or combat stomach cancer.

The study by researchers at the Federal University of São Paulo (UNIFESP) and the Federal University of Pará (UFPA) in Brazil identified possible therapeutic effects of this pigment and of other bioactive compounds found in food on stomach cancer, the third and fifth most frequent type of cancer among Brazilian men and women, respectively.

Scientists at the UNC School of Medicine have revealed that the reason we eat more than we need to may be caused by cellular communication originating in the emotion-processing center of the brain. The research was published in the journal Neuron yesterday.

As many as one in three women treated for breast cancer undergo unnecessary procedures, but a new method for diagnosing it could do a better job distinguishing between benign and aggressive tumors.

Researchers at the University of Michigan are developing a pill that makes tumors light up when exposed to infrared light, and they have demonstrated that the concept works in mice.

For the past seven years, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has reported on cases of a type of lymphoma associated with breast implants. Earlier this month, the FDA noted a rise in the amount of these cases over the past year – 414 cases – up from 359 in the previous year. Andrew M. Evens, DO, MSc, FACP, director of the Lymphoma Program and associate director for clinical services at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, and medical director of the oncology service line at RWJBarnabas Health, shares some insight.

For the past seven years, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has reported on cases of a type of lymphoma associated with breast implants. Earlier this month, the FDA noted a rise in the amount of these cases over the past year – 414 cases – up from 359 in the previous year. Andrew M. Evens, DO, MSc, FACP, director of the Lymphoma Program and associate director for clinical services at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, and medical director of the oncology service line at RWJBarnabas Health, shares some insight.

Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center researchers developed a single blood test that screens for eight common cancer types and helps identify the location of the cancer.

The test, called CancerSEEK, is a unique noninvasive, multianalyte test that simultaneously evaluates levels of eight cancer proteins and the presence of cancer gene mutations from circulating DNA in the blood. The test is aimed at screening for eight common cancer types that account for more than 60 percent of cancer deaths in the U.S. Five of the cancers covered by the test currently have no screening test.

A team of scientists from A*STAR's Institute of Medical Biology (IMB) and Genome Institute of Singapore (GIS) together with clinicians from Boston's Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) have identified a unique set of cells in the cervix that are the cause of human papillomaviruses (HPV) related cervical cancers. Significantly, the team also showed that these cells do not regenerate when excised.

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