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Vaginal Cancer

Cervical cancer can be insidious. Changes to the cervix are often detected with a pap smear, but for those with limited access to health care, cervical and vaginal cancers can go unnoticed for years--silently growing, spreading and invading other organs--and by the time they're detected, they may be so advanced that the patient's prognosis is poor and her treatment options few.

Calling human papillomavirus-related cancers a significant public health problem, the directors of the 70 National Cancer Institute-designated cancer centers, including UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, have issued a joint statement endorsing gender-neutral HPV vaccination and evidence-based cancer screening.

There are several types of gynecologic cancers that affect the female reproductive system, including endometrial, ovarian, cervical, vaginal and vulvar cancer.

In the case of cervical cancer, there is good news. Over the past 40 years, the mortality rate for cervical cancer patients has decreased by over 50 percent, thanks to the increased prevalence of the Pap test. Even better: In many cases, cervical cancer can be avoided altogether. To put yourself in the best position to prevent it, here are five things every woman (and man) should know about cervical cancer:

Treating cervical cancer cells with AHCC led to the eradication of HPV, human papillomavirus, as well as a decrease in the rate of tumor growth in-vitro and in-vivo, in research presented at the Society of Gynecological Oncology 45th Annual Meeting on Women's Cancer in Tampa, Florida. The study was led by Dr. Judith A. Smith, Pharm.D., at the University of Texas Health Science Center (UTHealth) Medical School at Houston.

Bottom Line: Women with a history of severe cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, a precancerous condition of the cervix that arises from infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV), had a long-term increased risk of developing anal, vulvar, and vaginal cancer.

Journal in Which the Study was Published: Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

Cervical cancer is the second most common cause of cancer-related death worldwide, with almost 300,000 deaths occurring each year. More than 80 percent of these deaths occur in developing nations. The advent of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines has significantly reduced the number of those who develop and die from cervical cancer. And thanks to an international effort to improve the vaccine, the medical community is one step closer to preventing more HPV-associated diseases.

There are several types of gynecologic cancers that affect the female reproductive system, including endometrial, ovarian, cervical, vaginal and vulvar cancer.

In the case of cervical cancer, there is good news. Over the past 40 years, the mortality rate for cervical cancer patients has decreased by over 50 percent, thanks to the increased prevalence of the Pap test. Even better: In many cases, cervical cancer can be avoided altogether. To put yourself in the best position to prevent it, here are five things every woman (and man) should know about cervical cancer:

Bottom Line: Women with a history of severe cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, a precancerous condition of the cervix that arises from infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV), had a long-term increased risk of developing anal, vulvar, and vaginal cancer.

Journal in Which the Study was Published: Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

Bottom Line: Women with a history of severe cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, a precancerous condition of the cervix that arises from infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV), had a long-term increased risk of developing anal, vulvar, and vaginal cancer.

Journal in Which the Study was Published: Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

Cervical cancer is the second most common cause of cancer-related death worldwide, with almost 300,000 deaths occurring each year. More than 80 percent of these deaths occur in developing nations. The advent of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines has significantly reduced the number of those who develop and die from cervical cancer. And thanks to an international effort to improve the vaccine, the medical community is one step closer to preventing more HPV-associated diseases.

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