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Combine a diet high in sugar with poor oral hygiene habits and dental cavities, or caries, will likely result. The sugar triggers the formation of an acidic biofilm, known as plaque, on the teeth, eroding the surface. Early childhood caries is a severe form of tooth decay that affects one in every four children in the United States and hundreds of millions more globally. It's a particularly severe problem in underprivileged populations.

cientists have developed a technique that allows them to measure how well cancer drugs reach their targets inside the body. It shows individual cancer cells in a tumor in real time, revealing which cells interact with the drug and which cells the drug fails to reach.

In the future, the findings, published in Nature Communications, could help clinicians decide the best course and delivery of treatment for cancer patients.

With Skin Cancer Awareness Month upon us, Colorado State University researcher Jesse Wilson is accelerating research to improve imaging and detection of melanoma, the most deadly form of skin cancer, and the fifth most common cancer in the United States.

Wilson, an associate professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) and in the School of Biomedical Engineering (SBME), is one of 15 researchers selected for a Young Investigator Award from the Melanoma Research Alliance.

A study conducted at The Wistar Institute in collaboration with The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center has demonstrated the efficacy of targeting aberrantly active telomerase to treat therapy-resistant melanoma. The research was published in the journal Clinical Cancer Research.

Researchers at Rice University and the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have refined and, for the first time, run in vivo tests of a method that may allow nanotube-based probes to locate specific tumors in the body. Their ability to pinpoint tumors with submillimeter accuracy could eventually improve early detection and treatment of ovarian cancer.

CANCER researchers seeking non-toxic alternatives to harmful chemotherapy are reporting a highly significant result for a humble cold remedy.

N-Acetyl cysteine  - or NAC - is routinely used as a dietary supplement and as a decongestant given to children to ward off a cold.

Now, clinical trials in the US indicate the cheap, over-the-counter drug, is a first rate inhibitor of the tumor stroma, a cell compartment which is fundamental to the spread of cancer.

Treating cervical cancer cells with AHCC led to the eradication of HPV, human papillomavirus, as well as a decrease in the rate of tumor growth in-vitro and in-vivo, in research presented at the Society of Gynecological Oncology 45th Annual Meeting on Women's Cancer in Tampa, Florida. The study was led by Dr. Judith A. Smith, Pharm.D., at the University of Texas Health Science Center (UTHealth) Medical School at Houston.

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